How are levels made?

Well hello there!

I’m writing to you from the bus today, I figured I might as well write a little something since there’s not much else to do.

Having spent most of the day outside for job interviews, I used that time to draft levels for Pinguino. It doesn’t look like much yet since the platforms are grid based and the game engine is nearly finished, the levels are a treat to design and will pretty much work no matter what.

Each levels has a key word and small draft of the idea behind it and that’s enough. Hopefully you can make some sense of it. If anything it goes to show level designs can be spontaneous.Pinguino - level desgn draft

When I get home tonight I’ll add what finished level looks like and talk a bit about level design in game maker.

Until then :)

And I’m back to say things that are actually interesting this time.

Like I mentioned earlier, level design is to me a really pleasant part of making a game. Once all the tedious aspects of creating the engine and the graphics are out of way. You’re left with a nice background and giant box of stickers to create your own world.
Because that’s what it actually is, in game maker and in pretty much any level editor (in 2D that is, of course). You have a grid, set to your own needs so blocks align nicely, and you simply place your objects to create the level.

Pinguino being an arcade type game, my levels begin short and become increasingly big and more challenging as you progress. The goal is really simple (collect all the fish before time runs out) and the levels themselves are pretty simple too, and mostly orientated around one main mechanic/idea, hence the names on the drafts.

Now as grand premier, let me present to you level 5!
Pinguino - Level 5Now of course this is the view in the editor, in-game it would look more like this.Pinguino - level 5 actual viewPinguino is nearing completion my friend, just  little more patience.

Until then

 

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